Insist on the Plot

adoxographist:

Hey guys! My friend faisdm and bishopmyers recently released a game for the 2014 Indie Game Maker Contest.

It’s a fairly short visual novel with point and click investigative mechanics. Still, although it’s pretty bite sized, I feel like Project BC has always done a really good job writing interesting and diverse characters. In the short amount of time it takes to play the game, you get a pretty good portrait of the primary characters, as well as the world the game takes place in. I personally really enjoyed it, and hopefully you all will too!

I would really appreciate it if you could help spread the word through tumblr, twitter or facebook, and, of course, check it out for yourselves!

(via traumendesmadchen)

Hatoful Boyfriend HD is now available for preorder on Steam for 10% off!

englishotomegames:

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You can get it here for USD$8.99 until August 21st, 2014, when the HD version of the game is released!

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Or, you can preorder Hatoful Boyfriend HD: Summer of Dove Collector’s Edition for USD$13.49. This version (along with the HD version) includes the original Hatoful Boyfriend (PC), digital soundtrack, an exclusive new comic from original developer Hato Moa, exclusive wallpapers of Oko-san, and the St. Pigeonations Yearbook (Class of 2014).

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iapologizeforthis:

A thing I wrote for sakevisual about recording for indie visual novels, but I figure you guys will likely find this interesting?
sakevisual:

Back when sakevisual started, voiced EVNs weren’t very common. In fact, the general public sentiment was that they should be avoided altogether due to things like filesize, and lack of good and/or affordable voice actors. But after the good response to Ripples, I knew I wanted Jisei to be voiced. It was a messy process trying to organize all of it the first time around, but the final product was well-received, and I was hooked. I resolved to make sure that any release I’d charge money for would have voices in it.
Because apparently things are more fun when they’re difficult.
Our process these days is less of a mess than it was for Jisei, but it’s still kind of a mash-up of several different things.
1.) Casting - This should take place once the script is complete. Casting at the start of production is generally not a great idea (speaking from experience), as you may lose voice actors along the way if you wait a long time to start recording. You’ll also have a much stronger grasp on what a character should sound like AFTER the script is written rather than before. When you cast, you can scout, hold closed auditions, or hold open auditions.
-Scouting: Offering a role directly to a single actor. In the case of Backstage Pass, the actors for the main five characters were cast this way.
-Closed Auditions: Picking a few actors you know and asking them all to read for a part, then choosing the one you think fits best. For Backstage Pass, I sent out auditions to several actors I know before choosing Rachel’s voice.
-Open Auditions: Posting auditions online (or elsewhere publicly) to get as many options as possible. I generally use this for supporting cast, as I like to find new talent and give people a chance to show off any voices I might not know they’re capable of. This is also the most time-consuming process of all, as you have to go through each audition carefully, and there are a lot. Backstage Pass brought in over 500 auditions, and I listened to every single one.
2.) Recording - AKA the fun part. With the rising popularity of online voice acting, it’s common for a creator to email scripts to everyone, then sit back and wait for the recordings to come rolling in. That’s the easiest path, and probably the one that will yield the worst results. You may have two talented actors in a scene, but if one actor reads an argument as a shouting match and the other reads it as a calm debate, they’re going to sound like they came from different games. When I use online actors, I call them up via Skype (or any other voice chat program) and listen in while they record. That way I can give direction and feedback live to get the most appropriate read possible. For local actors, I either use my own mic setup, or we record at a local studio (pictured above).
3.) Sound Editing - Or, the job most people forget exists. Once all the voices are recorded, they have to be cleaned up. Mics record at different volumes, and those have to all be adjusted to the same level. Stray clicking noises or breathing need to be removed. There’s a lot of sound engineering magic that goes on behind the scenes to make everything sound normal.
4.) Review - After all the lines are ready to go, they need to be reviewed. The director finally gets to listen to everyone together and hear a complete piece. This is where you check for anything that needs to be redone. Some lines may have background noise that can’t be fully removed. Maybe a read sounded good at the time, but doesn’t fit in the context of the other actors. Some of the lines may have been rewritten since you recorded. If anything needs to be redone, you call the actor back in and repeat 2-4 as necessary. If the actor isn’t available, you might even have to go back to step 1. Recasting in voiceover is actually fairly common, especially since there’s no face that viewers can connect with the character.

iapologizeforthis:

A thing I wrote for sakevisual about recording for indie visual novels, but I figure you guys will likely find this interesting?

sakevisual:

Back when sakevisual started, voiced EVNs weren’t very common. In fact, the general public sentiment was that they should be avoided altogether due to things like filesize, and lack of good and/or affordable voice actors. But after the good response to Ripples, I knew I wanted Jisei to be voiced. It was a messy process trying to organize all of it the first time around, but the final product was well-received, and I was hooked. I resolved to make sure that any release I’d charge money for would have voices in it.

Because apparently things are more fun when they’re difficult.

Our process these days is less of a mess than it was for Jisei, but it’s still kind of a mash-up of several different things.

1.) Casting - This should take place once the script is complete. Casting at the start of production is generally not a great idea (speaking from experience), as you may lose voice actors along the way if you wait a long time to start recording. You’ll also have a much stronger grasp on what a character should sound like AFTER the script is written rather than before. When you cast, you can scout, hold closed auditions, or hold open auditions.

-Scouting: Offering a role directly to a single actor. In the case of Backstage Pass, the actors for the main five characters were cast this way.

-Closed Auditions: Picking a few actors you know and asking them all to read for a part, then choosing the one you think fits best. For Backstage Pass, I sent out auditions to several actors I know before choosing Rachel’s voice.

-Open Auditions: Posting auditions online (or elsewhere publicly) to get as many options as possible. I generally use this for supporting cast, as I like to find new talent and give people a chance to show off any voices I might not know they’re capable of. This is also the most time-consuming process of all, as you have to go through each audition carefully, and there are a lot. Backstage Pass brought in over 500 auditions, and I listened to every single one.

2.) Recording - AKA the fun part. With the rising popularity of online voice acting, it’s common for a creator to email scripts to everyone, then sit back and wait for the recordings to come rolling in. That’s the easiest path, and probably the one that will yield the worst results. You may have two talented actors in a scene, but if one actor reads an argument as a shouting match and the other reads it as a calm debate, they’re going to sound like they came from different games. When I use online actors, I call them up via Skype (or any other voice chat program) and listen in while they record. That way I can give direction and feedback live to get the most appropriate read possible. For local actors, I either use my own mic setup, or we record at a local studio (pictured above).

3.) Sound Editing - Or, the job most people forget exists. Once all the voices are recorded, they have to be cleaned up. Mics record at different volumes, and those have to all be adjusted to the same level. Stray clicking noises or breathing need to be removed. There’s a lot of sound engineering magic that goes on behind the scenes to make everything sound normal.

4.) Review - After all the lines are ready to go, they need to be reviewed. The director finally gets to listen to everyone together and hear a complete piece. This is where you check for anything that needs to be redone. Some lines may have background noise that can’t be fully removed. Maybe a read sounded good at the time, but doesn’t fit in the context of the other actors. Some of the lines may have been rewritten since you recorded. If anything needs to be redone, you call the actor back in and repeat 2-4 as necessary. If the actor isn’t available, you might even have to go back to step 1. Recasting in voiceover is actually fairly common, especially since there’s no face that viewers can connect with the character.

dejinyucu:

The Autumn’s Journey Art Booklet is out!Come and grab it here:https://gumroad.com/l/AJbook
It’s 110 pages of PDF goodness with all the game art, extra sketches, creators commentary, two little side stories and the players fan art gallery~Thanks a lot again to the lovelies that drew fan art of Autumn’s Journey, we’re really happy!So we hope you enjoy this art book, it has a lot of love put into it <3

dejinyucu:

The Autumn’s Journey Art Booklet is out!

Come and grab it here:
https://gumroad.com/l/AJbook

It’s 110 pages of PDF goodness with all the game art, extra sketches, creators commentary, two little side stories and the players fan art gallery~

Thanks a lot again to the lovelies that drew fan art of Autumn’s Journey, we’re really happy!

So we hope you enjoy this art book, it has a lot of love put into it <3

obscurasoft:

Fixing up the guy who you’re supposed to play, aka Mark, aka “Hotbod McFuckmaster” according to the lovely Shadocchi.
Dammit, I already see something I forgot to change on him.  :/
Reminder: you can pick if he has a beard or body hair or both!  
A Kickstarter update is coming this month with details on the the estimated delivery date for the game.  
Thank you all for your support.  You are lovely people and deserve many, many cookies.

I DON&#8217;T REMEMBER SEEING THIS

obscurasoft:

Fixing up the guy who you’re supposed to play, aka Mark, aka “Hotbod McFuckmaster” according to the lovely Shadocchi.

Dammit, I already see something I forgot to change on him.  :/

Reminder: you can pick if he has a beard or body hair or both!  

A Kickstarter update is coming this month with details on the the estimated delivery date for the game.  

Thank you all for your support.  You are lovely people and deserve many, many cookies.

I DON’T REMEMBER SEEING THIS

ATTENTION: Sekai Project invites you to participate in a survey regarding the localisation of Key Games and other Visual Novels

natsumerincchi:

Important news guys! Sekai Project have just posted a link to a survey on social media asking followers for data on their buying preferences of Visual Novels, what companies’ games you’d like to see localised in the west, and more importantly to us, what Key games you would like to support localisation of through crowdfunding.

Why is this a big deal? Well, for a start it clearly demonstrates that Sekai Project is interested in localising Key’s other, more prominent titles, likely through crowdfunding. Angel Beats! was mentioned (which doesn’t even have a release date yet), which would imply that Key & Visual Art’s themselves likely had some input or have interest in the results of this survey. But very importantly, this is a search for interest. A pre-kickstarter, if you will. If enough people respond here and show what Key games they’re interested in, it could be instrumental in causing Key’s flagship games like Clannad, Little Busters! and Rewrite to be released in the west.

Here is your mission! Take this survey, answer honestly, and share it with others!

“Mission Start!”

Do it, guys. If we take part in this, we may see one day see Little Busters, Clannad, Rewrite, Kanon and Air, and maybe even the upcoming Angel Beats VN, be localized! This is BIG. These are the same people who are putting out the official English release of Planetarian for PC. Let’s make this happen, everyone!

(via sekaiproject)